Euphemisms and Idioms for "drunk"

Hiya! One of my favorite things about different languages (such as the many different people we have here!) is how they tell you someone is drunk!

So, What do you or people in your native language say? I’ll edit them in as we go along. :slight_smile:

~ENGLISH~

  • Three sheets to the wind
  • Hammered
  • Brown-out (and black-out)
  • Looking for nightcrawlers (as in on hands/knees)
  • Wasted
  • Sauced
  • Shined (Texas only?)
  • Plastered
  • s**t-faced
  • Liquored up

~GERMAN~

  • Paniert (Breaded)
  • hacke / hacke-voll (?)
  • blau (blue)
  • dun (?)
  • voll wie ein eimer (full as a bucket)
  • stern-hagel-voll ("starry hails full)
  • beduselt
  • lattenstramm (as “strap as a plank”)
  • voll wie eine irische Kirche (full like an irish church)

~AUSTRALIAN~

  • “Pissed”
  • On the piss
  • “Blind” said with an ear piercingly high and elongated “i” sound.
  • Maggotted
  • Blue / Blue Drunk
  • Blotto

~FRENCH~

  • Buttered (like bread)
  • Rounded (like a shovel)

~CHILEAN~

  • Curado (to be cured)
  • Como pico (like a dick)
  • Arriba de la pelota (over the ball)
  • Andar contento (being happy)
  • Andar jugoso (being “juicy”)

~ESTONIAN~

  • Täis (full, filled)
  • Täis nagu siga (filled like a pig)
  • Aia taga (behind the fence, as in someone falls through/behind a fence because of drunkenness)

~SWEDISH~

  • Packad (Packed, like filled)

~IRISH~

  • Locked (like a door)
  • Pissed
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We just call them stupid at my house lol

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I just had someone tell me:
German: Paniert (Breaded)

Tossed, ■■■■■■■■■, Blackout, Brown-out, Three-Sheets (or Three Sheets to the Wind), ■■■■■■■■■■.

My favorite local one that I hear every year is “looking for nightcrawlers”. As in on hands and knees, vomiting.

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Region? And I can’t see the expletives.

Duh THREE sheets to the wind. We say four in my family as a running joke about being more drunk than three and I just forgot that we did that, lol.

Appalachian mountains. Very much a southernism.

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Wasted, smashed, Sauced, shined. From texas

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Mine are in Spanish, dunno if it counts

Of course they count! Please. Though, I’d prefer the Spanish word and the literal translation

I’ve heard plastered used before I’m in Kentucky btw, so pretty southern.

There’s also
■■■■ faced

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Accidentally horizontal…

All I see is white screen D=

I’ve got some common Australia ones.

“Pissed”

“Blind” said with an ear piercingly high and enlongagted “i” sound.

Thank you Sandman!

@all I just found out from a french friend:

  • Buttered (like bread)
  • Rounded (like a shovel)

GERMAN

  • hacke / hacke-voll (?)
  • blau (blue)
  • dun (?)
  • voll wie ein eimer (full as a bucket)
  • stern-hagel-voll ("starry hails full)
  • beduselt
  • lattenstramm (as “strap as a plank”)
  • voll wie eine irische Kirche (full like an irish church)

(?) = don´t know how to translate that…

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This is great!

“Dun” is not the same as dunn? (Though, skinny wouldn’t make a lot of sense)

Beduselt and Hacke-voll might just mean “drunk”, so there may not be a translation.

but thanks again. I’ll add it!

Irish.

^^
No, “Dun” is northern german dialect for dunk, “dünn” means skinny :slight_smile: Its the nasty “ü”.

“Hacke-voll” means by word “full as a mattock” lol

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Curado (to be cured)
Como pico (like a dick)
Arriba de la pelota (over the ball)
Andar contento (being happy)
Andar jugoso (being “juicy”)

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