Learn something new every day

Eat first, before the food fights back!

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Even if it looks that friendly?

Though one may point out that having to kill your food yourself was the standard way of things for quite a bit of history.

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‘Eat or be eaten’ is a powerful motivator.

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Sometimes the classics can’t be beaten. It’s a motivator that practically everyone, even many non-humans, understand without problem.

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This exists.
https://www.ebay.com/i/313122959293?chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-213727-13078-0&mkcid=2&itemid=313122959293&targetid=4580290572086399&device=c&mktype=&googleloc=&poi=&campaignid=403204655&mkgroupid=1227055191472610&rlsatarget=pla-4580290572086399&abcId=9300377&merchantid=51291&msclkid=d62072cddb061493455c2d46341ee53d

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Well, this is cool.

From the article:

-The team has been exploring the reef using an underwater robot called “SuBastian”…-

I see what you did there, guys. :smirk:

-The ‘detached’ reef is — the first to be discovered in more than 120 years — is around 1.5 kilometres long, and rises from over 500 metres deep up to 40 metres below the surface.-

  • is estimated to be 20 million years old-

Ain’t it cool?

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Just found this thread looks cool. I just read the first few posts then zoomed down to the active last posts and will read the rest when I have some time. So sorry if this one has already been mentioned.

New York was briefly called New Orange.

The Dutch captured New York in 1673 from the English and renamed it New Orange in honour of William of Orange. The English took it back the following year and changed it back.

So before it was the Big Apple it was the New Orange :slight_smile:

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Toronto was originally named ‘York’ as well. I think they might have been going to call it ‘New York’ but that was already taken, obviously. It was named after Fort York (which you can still visit and tour).

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Competitive art used to be part of the Olympics.

Between 1912 - 1948 the Olympic games awarded medals in music, sculpture, painting and architecture.

John Copley a Brit won one of the final medals awarded at the age of 73. If his silver medal was still counted in the records today it would make him the oldest Olympian in history.

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This isn’t new to me, as “Each one teach one” is likely my favorite proverb, but while I believe it to be very important its history is rooted in our tragic and problematic past.

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I’ve heard of the Nocebo affect before - mostly in the context of claims of electromagnetic susceptibility - but the magnitude of the affect with statins was very surprising. The human mind is a weird and wonderful thing…

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Today I learned, or rather re-emphasized, that “the dog’s bollocks” is a phrase that indicates “best of…”, but I actually newly learned that it is the term for a specific typographical construction, namely [:-] (excluding the brackets).

Bonus points if you click the link to see the picture of dog’s bollocks in the US Declaration of Independence.

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Huh. I didn’t know that the term applied to that construct, or even had a typographical association. It was a very common term to hear in south east London growing up.

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As a humble rebellious colonist I encountered it in film, I want to say Snatch but could easily be wrong. The exchange that I hear in my head being: “So, bollocks is bad?” “Yes.” “But the dog’s bollocks is good?” “Right.” Hence Google, hence new knowledge, hence a giggle at seeing it in the Declaration of Independence.

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FTR, the opposite would be “a dog’s breakfast”

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Literary trivia, that expression is where the title of the Vonnegut novel “Breakfast of Champions” comes from, though there the expression is used in reference to the human brain.

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