Political Discussion Thread II

Ah what the hell. ■■■■ posting trifecta

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Old guy confuses vaccine website. That surely is a sign of dementia far worse than not knowing which country one just bombed, ain’t it?

Nice to see that the election loser remembered the ‘most beautiful piece of chocolate cake’ at least.

Meanwhile, making fun of a little less old people:

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Crash Alert!

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Huh. I thought the Chinese had better control of their rockets than this - they usually have them crash on bits of their own country they don’t value as much. (And yes, those bits are none the less inhabited.) I wonder if something went wrong after it had dropped the space station segment in orbit? Given the number of modules they’re planning to send up, this is a little concerning.

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That may depend on the timeline. If one checks before the rocket crashes the area may be inhabited. After is another thing entirely…

Hyperbole, I know, but concerning anyway.

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Bear in mind, it’s not a satellite if it slows down.

And pray it comes to serve man.

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From the things mentioned in this article, Alberta is definitely in the running to be Canada’s Florida (assuming it hasn’t already seized that crown):

Flip-flopping government, rules without enforcement, death threats, and crazed conspiracy theories? Time to update that Bugs Bunny cartoon for north of 49…


So, are there any penalties liable if the US AG is found be federal judges to have lied not once, but twice?

The waters there are looking very murky: the document claimed by Barr as confidential legal opinion on whether or not Trump should face obstruction charges (from the Mueller report) has been ruled as not privileged, and to be released as per several FOIA requests. This after another judge had previously ruled that Barr’s released summary mischaracterized the content and findings of the Mueller report.

When judges start throwing words like “misleading” and “disingenuous” around, you know they aren’t happy.


Edit to add article link:

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Not if the GOP has to say something about it. Accountability isn’t their forte…

‘Malfeasance in office’ may be applicable here, but that’s just a hunch (wrong country :man_shrugging:).

Yep.

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I’ve said it before, but the sheer scope of criminal activity in the Trump administration is so great that if anything was to be done about that, it would effectively merit its own task force. That said, behavior like Barr’s actually isn’t something I’d expect to wind up prosecuted even in that case. I’m not even entirely sure what he did here was illegal, as I don’t know if what he wrote would count as say, lying to Congress. It’s one of those things that might be a crime, but even a normal administration might get away with it.

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Seems like a great time to expand on the Cascadia idea. BC secedes and joins WA, OR and CA….might as well take Idaho and Nevada while we’re at it.

The rest of Canada evicts Alberta to be annexed by Montana, to be a part of….how about we call it “The Big Range” : WY, UT, AZ, CO, NM, TX can all form their own country so they can quad all over each others’ ranches eatin’ beef, shootin’ immigrants and exercising their Rights and Freedoms to lynch their tyrant government officials.

49th done.
You’re welcome everyone.

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You wouldn’t like Idaho politically Jefe. I would admittedly be amused by the rest though, the west coast has basically its own culture frankly. Albeit it diverges at points you might not guess (eastern Oregon is more like Idaho, and Nevada is kind of its own thing).

Then again, even the west coast itself has a lot of weird divides. Basically you could group it into SoCal (unpleasant, kind of like New York city unfriendly in some ways), NorCal/Southern Oregon (hippies be here), Portland (more pleasant than SoCal), and Seattle (still better than SoCal, but less than Portland and a bit trashy).

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Perfect match for Vancouver!

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We prefer the term “stand-offishly affectionate.” :wink:

Funny enough, whenever I meet people from overseas who have visited NYC they always tell me how friendly the people here are. Rare are the times when I hear that our reputation for unfriendliness in the USA carries over international borders. :man_shrugging:

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It’s probably a side effect of the shock travellers experienced when they encountered US customs and border folks at the airport - compared to that, a hungry alligator would seem friendly.

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I think in JFK and LGA we might have slightly less nasty, almost friendly, border agents. Coming back from Mexico (in 2012 or so, could be different now) I came through Houston, and those border agents were nasty to everyone regardless of passport. Comparatively the counter in NYC airports looks, sounds, and operates, like a hotel reception desk.

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So returning to an earlier topic dear to the heart of @Arsonist at least, it’s starting to be clear just how desperate the major US ISPs/Telcos/Cable companies are to maintain their effective monopolies:

And that’s the Broadband for America industry group, comprising the usual suspects: Comcast, Charter, AT&T, Cox, and CenturyLink, along with trade groups CTIA—The Wireless Association (of which Verizon is a member), NCTA—The Internet & Television Association, and the Telecommunications Industry Association.

Of course, they all have plausible deniability as the BfA contracted third-parties to do they lobbying, and it was those groups responsible for astroturfing the submitted comments using people’s identities without their knowledge or permission. But the BfA paid for it, and that money came from those companies.

Not all the fake comments were opposed to net neutrality, though note the final sentence in the next quotation:

Interestingly, despite all the red flags, complaints, and publicity surrounding fraudulent comments at the time, Ajit Pai went ahead and demolished net neutrality despite 98.5 percent of genuine comments being opposed to deregulation.

That’s some massive chutzpah, there.

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Honestly, more concerned with the result of this, Pai was going to do that either way. Regulatory capture is why he was there in the first place. Telling companies that they can pay what is to them basically nothing, violate the law en masse in multiple ways, and then benefit from it has serious additional long term consequences.

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There’s a chance that this might make it easier for a new FCC chair (someone along the lines of Wheeler) to reverse the inane Pai-plot, or at least amend it enough to take the worst of it away.

Unfortunately, nominating an FCC chair seems to be very low on the administration’s priority list.

A different thing to be concerned about are the names being floated for the head of the US patent office - Trump’s appointee basically killed the IPR process, and one of his judicial appointments has out-Texased the East Texas court that was previously seen as most patent-holder friendly.

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All that’s needed for that is said appointment. Frankly what happened was basically by fiat. Unless there’s an attempt to go through Congress, it just requires the majority of commissioners I’m fairly sure.

As for patents, the system is in need of reform in general.

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This is terrible:

Can we say ‘massive lawsuit’? Thought so. At least no one died.

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