What are you reading right now?

Not much of a reader but I thought about you guys/gals.

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Vellichor, from the roots velli- (pertaining to vellum, old paper made from dried hide) and -ichor (blood/essence of the gods), so it would gloss translate to paper’s blood/essence, or more loosely book’s blood. “Real word?” Maybe not. But it should be, dammit.

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A couple more library impulse grabs.

For work : Bluebeard’s Eggs — short stories by the inimitable Margaret Atwood. She always delivers a perfect story.

For home : A Legacy of Spies by John Le Carré — his last novel and ties up the Smiley saga. It’s been a very long time since I’ve read his stuff and I think this one deserves a go.

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Night Watch by Terry Pratchett!

NO SPOILERS

I’ve read quite a lot of the early discworld stuff and… have very firmly decided that the watch is my favorite part of it. There’s something… just great about Vimes maybe outgunning Raylan Givens as my favorite fantasy lawman, Vetinari’s political intrigue, and the early dabs at how useful diversity can be.

Next on deck is One Word Kill by Mark Lawrence, who I still recommend wholeheartedly.

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Finished:

Nothing too new in it, but it’s entertaining and interesting, so no complaints here.

Next up: The Book Of Why by Judea Pearl.

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I just now finished Piranesi by Susanna Clarke.

I admit I was a little irritated with the first act while reading it but of course I figured, and ultimately this was confirmed, this was by design. But the book slowly attains its rhythm, or rather one slowly attains a rhythm with the book, which is when the feeling starts to take hold. Its slow immersion into its world becomes the most astonishing thing.

At the end one is left with the absolute perfection of her storytelling. What a perfect world, perfect characters, what a perfect ending. Clarke is such a remarkable craftsman and I can’t wait for her next, which should be in another 15 years……

Incidentally, she evidently got inspiration from Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s etchings which are pretty cool.

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This was my experience with 100 Years of Solitude. Until I caught the feeling the book intended it irked me greatly. I should probably reread it and see if that first bit feels better now that I know the feel.

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Won this in a Twitter giveaway. I know the author, but the main selling point is wild west fantasy. Started it today, and it is off to an auspicious start. Lots of violence up front and then a rewind to the setup, which is a pretty overdone trope at this point (though I tend to like it in films), but so far it’s good enough that I’m not mad.

My friend that did the giveaway also included incense, this nice glass horse and a pair of sweet bandanas.

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I’m starting to get sick of that trope. It’s like the author/filmmaker is saying “look I know you have no attention span so here’s some stuff to promise you that things will happen in this story.”

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A couple new library grabs. Very psyched about this graphic novel

Also this one which seems like a take on the changling story

Clearly you can tell from his hair that the author himself a changling.

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I read “The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave.” Having a contemporary account of the violence and cruelty of slavery is, I feel, an effective tool to bridge the distance of history and remind us that behind well known events and statistics there are always real human beings.

And it’s incredible how the excuses people make for racism really haven’t changed much in 150 years.

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Meh. The graphic novel was generically illustrated and Gibson’s story was laughable : time travel alt-history WWII. Really, Bill? Never read a story with that premise before.

And The Stolen Child is going back for the the author’s cardinal sin of overwriting. A tip for you Mr Donohue : when in doubt, leave it out.

Edit: can’t beat Ondaatje as a writer. Should be good.

image

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Well, I finished that last book I was reading, and enjoyed it front to back. Overdone trope notwithstanding, His Ragged Company was a good read. I’d recommend it. I’ve even posted a review on my little blog, if you’d like to get a fuller idea of how I felt about it. Next up, the Oath and Blood Price by Peter Shaun Tyrell.

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“Fantasy Western” is not a term I was expecting to see!

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I had a week off and read through Becky Chambers’ A Psalm For The Wild-Built, William Gibson’s The Peripheral and Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz, to take a break from sci-fi.

Currently reading:

Heh, there are whole RPGs built on that concept (which I only know cause I am playing Deadlands with a few friends at the moment :wink: Yay Pen & Paper!)

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Currently reading:

Reading shortens the wait for my next train…

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Currently finishing up the Oath and Blood Price part 1 and wishing part 2 was already available, but I just grabbed this and I think I’m gonna be reading it straight away. It just seems like it should be an interesting collection of borderline offensive (by today’s standards) concepts.

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Finished Brandon Sanderson’s Skyward, which treads very well known paths, but was written good enough to not put it down.

Next up:

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Margaret Atwood - The Handmaid’s tale.

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Just finished the Wild Party by Joseph Moncure March. A narrative poem circa 1929 about, well, a wild party. My edition is illustrated by Art Spiegelman of Maus fame. I liked it a bunch. This bit in particular really got my wheels turning.

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