Why is hammerlock and his sister black

Based on her Dad I would figure the Calypsos are at least half Jewish.

I know I’ve kind of scoffed at these discussions before but I guess as long as we’re on it again I’ll admit that the one I’ve always been unsure about is whether Fiona and Sasha are blood relatives or not.

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if they were real life persons i would assume just mixed
same as troy and tyreen

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I find Hammerlock weird. Hes clearly styled after White Victorian Big-Game hunters from Britain (English and posh, specifically). Given that he’s either a light-skinned POC or a tanned white man, I assumed he was white at first. When I became aware of this discussion/argument, I looked back at him and thought “huh, guess he’s supposed to be black/POC and mocking that style, rather than conforming to that style”.
The borderlands games are a bit difficult, given their cartoony look. There’s several characters that are hard to discern their ethnicity, and people argue over it. Seems weird, given that none of them are from Earth and are only loosely based on our ethnicity. Given the complaints about Roland being the only black/POC character in B1, I’m not surprised they tried to add more, but I wonder if they tried to add them without making it glaring or keep them pale so they could retcon older characters to be POC. Roland is very dark skinned compared to others, so I get why people compare characters to him and think, “they must be white”, but that’s pretty reductionist, and there could be tons of different ethnic groups within the borderlands (and arriving from outside them).

For what it’s worth, if the creators say a character is a particular race, I’ll go with that. If they don’t announce it, I’ll go with what I think they are, but it doesn’t really matter to me anyway.

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Take Van Pelt (from Jumanji), as an example.
image
and Hammy, dressed similarly.

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OK, I’m just going to drop something here and leave the thread temporarily closed while people have a chance to think about it a bit.

https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/newsroom/what-does-it-mean-be-black-now

https://muse.jhu.edu/article/699339

Just a selection from a quick search. The gist being: don’t assume that everyone has the same definition of what being ‘black’ means, and DEFINITELY don’t base it off stereotypes.

Also remember that these are characters in a video game in a made up universe.

Oh, and pre-emptively please read the FORUM RULES - just for a quick refresher, eh? Thanks.

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This topic was automatically opened after 72 minutes.

In Aurelia’s case specifically, she’s a bit of a riff on the DC Comics character Killer Frost, who is sometimes a villain, and sometimes a hero (as portrayed quite well in the current TV series adaptation of The Flash) and I think that colored (pun intended) the way 2K Australia programmed her into the game in her first appearance. The Devs on that game gave her pale skin, just like Killer Frost. Hell, some versions of Killer Frost even have pale BLUE skin, much like Mister Freeze!

BTW, I named my in-game version of her Killer Frost because the homage was so obvious to me. Even her basic power (shooting out ice shards) is a power we’ve seen Killer Frost use in the comics! :wink: :+1:

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“Black people are just white people but black.”

      -black science man
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I gotta ask, y’all remember McCloud, that one Crimson Lance Boss from BL1? Or the occasional unmasked Lance member models we see?

Yeah, they used Roland’s head and made the skin tone white.

Not exactly relevant, but I thought that was a little detail that no one’s talked about, and it’s an example of how the developers really didn’t care about the race of the characters.

I dunno… I mean, again, there’s concept art.

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But again, the Developers at 2K Australia did NOT stick to that concept art, and changed the skin tone from what it was on the concept art! For frak’s sake, just look at her actual, on-screen appearance IN-GAME!

And again, since AT LEAST Borderlands 2, the Devs have been very open and honest about the fact that many of the Vault Hunters were inspired by other popular fictional characters out there in Pop Culture. Axton is Duke from G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, ZER0 was inspired by pretty much every popular ninja in pop culture from the last 35-40 years, from Snake-Eyes (again, G.I. Joe: ARAH) to the cyber ninja in the Metal Gear Solid games, and beyond! And Aurelia was clearly inspired by Killer Frost, from the ice powers she wields as a Player Character, down to her tendency to wear outfits that are mostly shades of blue, and even her choker has an icy star symbol, similar to the symbol Killer Frost usually wears. About the only thing missing is skin that’s actually white or pale blue, which is how Killer Frost most often looks in the comics, and even in most of her video game appearances:

Now, in the TV show, her skin tone change isn’t as extreme, and it looks more realistic, but it is still pale, because that reads as icy and cold:

So, you just have to excuse 2K Australia for changing the skin tone to better match the character that inspired Aurelia. :man_shrugging:

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Well, why make a black character design in the first place and then later on change it back to black? Or do you think 2k Australia got the character designs supplied at the ready and then were only meant to interpret them and program the game?

To Be Honest, I’m not sure what the case was with 2K Australia. And since 2K Games shut down that studio completely before they’d even finished all of the planned DLC for The Pre-Sequel, we’re a lot less likely to get an official answer from the Developers of that game at this point. :man_shrugging:

As for me and my own Head Canon, I’m just chalking it up to the 2 of them using the Quick Change Stations to change their personal appearances, including their skin tone, and leaving it at that. Now where’s my No Prize, True Believers? :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

I’m still trying to figure why my comment was flagged.

Honnestly, I hardly see why some people here don’t understand the surprise around this fact. While the concept art are, without a shred of doubt, making the hammerlocks as “black”, the actual artwork and in-game depiction we had over the courses of the different game is really confusing.

As I said, if you just look at is based on physical feature, they seem to be mixed, which would make sense as for what they can somehow be confusing to clearly identify.

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Most likely someone got offended over your use of a particular word in the English language. :man_shrugging:

Not sure why people are surprised that there is confusion about this. After all, how long have people thought Jesus was a white dude? I think a lot still do. In fact, I bet a lot of people actually think Jesus was an American.

My only question is…why does anyone care either way? Black looking white dude. White looking black dude. How about just cool mustachio dude? You’re welcome. I solved racism. :grin: :zipper_mouth_face:

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Hammerlock has always been Black? Gee…you could have fooled me. I mean, we are talking about ‘The Great White Hunter’ with the bionic arm, no???

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It’s what the writer who created the character said. And I don’t think he’s actually referred to as a great white hunter anywhere in the game? Sure, he fits the look/stereotype, but that doesn’t really matter since this is the Borderlands universe we’re talking about and not some actual place you could visit where it not for travel restrictions.

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Don’t bring that into this, keep politics and personal jabs out of a thread that was already locked once today.

As for the actual topic, I’ll throw in that I too just thought he was tanned from his travels, or maybe Mediterranean. But, really he is probably, or probably would be, more than just black considering it’s the future and there would be plenty of people who are of mixed races. Moze is a perfect example, just look at her name!
Moserah Hayussinian Yan-Lun al-Amir Andreyevna in order, that is Hebrew, (a made up name), Chinese, Arabic, and Russian.

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